top of page

LONG LIVE ARTS FEST, 2016

"Youth Arts Fest”

"Youth Arts Fest”

Arts Fest began in 1982 with as "Youth" Arts Fest and was held in Sweetheart Circle, a tradition continued today.

The Journey Continues

The Journey Continues

2016: Statesboro Parks & Rec. Department hosted the event for the first time after 33 years from the Betty Foy Department

Budget

Budget

Last year, the event cost $11,400 to run. This caused members of the community to partner together and form this year's Arts Fest.

Community

Community

Community Partners such as the Averitt Center and Bulloch County Schools provided live performances on this year's solo stage.

Attendance

Attendance

A large turnout for 2016 due to perfect weather compared to last year. 2014: Approx. 5,000, 2015: Approx. 3,000

Statesboro Humane Society

Statesboro Humane Society

A annual attendee to Arts Fest, the Humane Society adopted one dog and found two new foster homes at this year's event.

*Information compiled from Connect Statesboro at: http://www.connectstatesboro.com/news/article/9281/

A video package, by Meg Elwood

SHOWING UP TO SAVE LIVES

Thursday, April 28, 2016 :: By Meg Elwood

STATESBORO - The Statesboro Humane Society was present at the 2016 Arts Fest, held in Georgia Southern’s historic Sweetheart Circle, to raise awareness of adoption, spay and neutering importance.

 

The event also served as an adoption opportunity for some of the dogs and cats under the Society’s care. Although Arts Fest is not the top event for pet adoption, Courtney Washington, canine rescue coordinator for the Humane Society, said that their presence helps educate the locals of Statesboro about the Society and their cause.

 

“The difference between our Arts Fest and Petco events is that it might not do a lot of adoptions, but we get to talk to everyone in the community about who we are and what we do. A lot of people think we’re the shelter, but we’re not,” Washington said.

 

Shilo Forman, volunteer and fundraising coordinator of the Humane Society, said that many people believe the Society is similar to animal control and acts as a pound. Forman said that in reality, the they save as many as six to eight animals a week from the shelter, where they are to be euthanized due to overpopulation.

Once in the care of the Humane Society, animals are given proper medical attention such as spay and neutering, along with any other necessary surgeries.

 

Jace, a two-year-old male Mastiff mix, who was present at the Arts Fest for adoption, was saved from the shelter as a last-chance dog. Growing up, his eyelids rolled inward, causing his lashes to constantly irritate his eyes, which increased the chances of infection.

 

Carrie Mitchell, former president and current feline rescue coordinator of the Humane Society, said that the shelter contacted her in an attempt to save Jace’s life.

 

Mitchell said, “He’s a wonderful dog, but he needed surgery, and he was not going to be able to have that at the shelter, so they were going to have to put him down… So, we pulled him [from the shelter], he had his surgery, he’s doing great, and now he’s up for adoption.”

 

Sources:

Shilo Forman: photographybyshilo@gmail.com

Courtney Washington: courtneygwashington@gmail.com

Carrie Mitchell: carriehumane@gmail.com

FUNDRAISING WITH FUNNEL CAKES

A photo/audio package, by Meg Elwood

bottom of page